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Osher Online Courses

The following courses are offered to Clemson OLLI Members as part of the national Osher Online
project bringing stellar presenters to OLLIs across the country. Each course is offered live via Zoom – plan to participate from the comfort of home! And in each session will be Members from several different OLLIs; each OLLI is limited to 12 seats per course. Each course is comprised of six, 90-minutes sessions and will offer generous question and answer periods. Before each course, participants will be contacted by the Osher Online staff at Northwestern University with further instructions.

The Jewish Holidays: A Primer

6 Tuesdays, January 9 to February 20 (No class on February 13)
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

Explore the yearly cycle of Jewish holidays and unlock the mysteries of the Jewish calendar, learning about major and minor holidays, historical practices, and modern observances. Whether you have grown up with these holidays, or are learning for the first time, enrich your understanding of and connection to these sacred moments in time.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Rabbi Alexis Pinsky was ordained from the New York campus of the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion. She is a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbis - the rabbinic organization for the Reform Movement.  She has held Associate Rabbinic positions at Temple Israel of the City of New York and B'ShERT (Beth Shalom V'Emeth Reform Temple) in Brooklyn, NY and has served/taught in numerous NYC congregations and institutions.

Themes in Philosophy, Part 2

6 Wednesdays, January 10 to February 14
1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

Discover fascinating themes in philosophy—a philosophy buffet! Topics include philosophical types of religion, religion and politics in America, aesthetics, philosophy of language, philosophy of culture, and philosophy of happiness. What are the differences between conservative, liberal, and fundamentalist forms of religion? What is the relationship between religion and politics in the United States? What is art, and what is good art? Why is language so fascinating? What is culture, and do people in our culture invoke it responsibly? Finally, what is happiness and how can we experience it? Themes in Philosophy Part 1 is not a prerequisite as this course stands alone.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Dr. David E. Smith grew up in the world of fundamentalist religion. As an adult he gradually moved away from that worldview and became a religious progressive/skeptic. After earning an M.A.

in philosophy of religion, he received a second M.A. and a Ph.D. in religious studies from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly a full-time philosophy and religious studies faculty member at Central Washington University in Ellensburg, WA, he now teaches for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Washington.

6 Wednesdays, January 10 to February 14
3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

Why exactly is murder and mayhem so popular and even relaxing to read about? The mystery genre is one of the most popular genres today, but it is relatively new. The first modern detective novels were published by Edgar Allan Poe in the nineteenth century, which ushered in a boom of mystery novels in America and the UK in subsequent years. In this class, we’ll study mystery novels of the 1920s through 1940s—including books by Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie; hardboiled crime novels; and Nancy Drew—and we’ll learn what made them so popular. The mystery genre is uniquely positioned to reflect and address fears of the populace, so studying these novels gives us unique insight into what people cared about most when they were published. We will also examine why it's so fun to read about horrible crimes and try to understand what we get out of it.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Dr. Brittney Rakowski is a Lecturer in the University College at the University of Oklahoma. Her research and teaching interests include twentieth-century American literature and film, gender
studies, and rhetoric.

Made in America: The History, and Vision of the Public Library

6 Wednesdays, January 10 to February 14
7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

This course will explore the history of the modern public library from the early nineteenth century through the present. Students will gain an enhanced appreciation for the role of the public library in a democratic society, as well as the ways in which the public library is a uniquely American invention.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Dr. Caroline Nappo is an independent scholar with interests in the history of libraries and information
institutions, information as a public good, and the political economy of information. She has her M.S.
and Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

6 Thursdays, January 11 to February 15
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

Explore the many contributions Justice Ginsburg made to the legal landscape, from her work as an advocate for gender equality, her role as the co-founder of the ACLU's Women's Rights Project, and her opinions on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. Her early influences will also be discussed. Clips from the documentary RBG will be shared and discussed - you may have seen the film, but this talk will cover much more!

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Lauren Andersen is the director of the Utah Judicial Institute. For two and a half years, she practiced
appellate law in the state of California and presented arguments to the California Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court. During this time, Lauren closely studied the Roberts Court. She has lectured about the Supreme Court and the death penalty. Her opinions were quoted by The New York Times as well as the ABA Journal. She was previously the director of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Utah for four years.

Native Ground: Indigenous Communities & Colonization Before 1900

6 Mondays, February 19 to March 25
5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Zoom Virtual Classroom
Tuition: $59

ABOUT THE COURSE

"Native Ground" will introduce students to the depth of Native American history in what is now the United States, as well as its diversity. From this foundation, the course will move to consider the implications of the invasion from Europe, the founding of European colonies, and the eventual (not inevitable) establishment of the United States and its expansion across Native North America. The course will emphasize the resilience of Indigenous communities in the face of relentless colonial pressure. Along the way, students can expect to learn about several related topics, including the historiography of Native America and the image of the "Indian" in the American mind.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Dr. Matt Jennings joined the Macon State College (now Middle Georgia State University) faculty in
2007, after receiving his Ph.D. from the University of
 

Illinois. His research interests include Native American history, early American history, and the history of violence. He is currently studying the relationship between Native American peoples and the mounds at Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park, and the intertwined history of tourism and archaeology at the site. His current research includes work with the Acme Brewing Historical Society in Georgia and a study of the Ocmulgee River region during the War of 1812. He has presented numerous papers, and published several books, including New Worlds of Violence, The Flower Hunter and the People, and Ocmulgee National Monument: A Concise History with Field Notes.

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